Education

Educational resources on our world's ocean

The Global Governance Monitor

The Global Governance Monitor: Oceans

The earth's oceans are increasingly threatened by a dizzying array of dangers, from piracy to climate change. To safeguard the world’s oceans, countries around the world need to embrace more effective multilateral governance in the economic, security, and environmental realms. So far, the most comprehensive attempt to govern the oceans produced the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS). But U.S. refusal to ratify the convention has limited its strength, leaving a vacuum in the maritime regime. At the same time, other states that have joined the treaty sometimes ignore its guidelines or fail to coordinate policies across sovereign jurisdictions. Even if it were perfectly implemented, UNCLOS is now almost thirty years old and in need of updating. The Global Governance Monitor: Oceans is an interactive guide to oceans governance, featuring six components:

A mini-documentary providing a cinematic overview of the main challenges and objectives of oceans governance;

An  interactive timeline tracing the history of international efforts to understand and regulate the oceans and the high seas, from 1419 to present day;

An issue brief summarizing the strengths and weaknesses of the oceans regime. The issue brief includes steps the United States and international institutions should take to correct glaring gaps, such as ratifying strengthening, and updating UNCLOS; coordinating national ocean policies for coastal states; strengthening high seas fishing governance; reducing plastic pollution; increasing funding for research, exploration, and monitoring; and bolstering capacity of developing coastal states;

A matrix cataloging all relevant international agreements, resolutions, conventions, bodies and organizations that address global oceans governance, including their coverage, mandates, and gaps;

An interactive map detailing the geographic distribution of increasingly relevant challanges facing the oceans, from dying coral reefs, dead zones, and the melting poles to chokepoints, slavery, and piracy;

A list of resources , including recommended readings, multimedia, essential books, and relevant CFR experts on ocean issues and governance.

 

 
National Ocean Sciences Bowl

National Ocean Sciences Bowl

The ocean is an ideal interdisciplinary teaching tool for science, technology, education, and mathematics (STEM) that puts study in a real world context. Working in the ocean environment poses challenges that push the innovation, engineering, and technology development needed in our workforce. But ocean science is not a course generally offered at the high school level. The National Ocean Sciences Bowl (NOSB) is one of the only ways students gain exposure to all of ocean science and related careers as they are beginning to chart their course in life.

 
 
News-O-Matic

News-O-Matic

News-O-Matic offers children their first daily news app. Its mission is to report current events to a young audience in a true, concise, educational, and emotionally safe manner. NOM’s content awakens children’s curiosity on different topics, opening the doors to the world. NOM encourages children to become habitual readers of the news naturally and it’s teachers guide is fully aligned with National Standards, making it a great asset to any classroom. NOM offers a fun and highly interactive experience. Articles are supported by short videos, educational games, and fun facts. The daily games relate to the stories of the day. An interactive map connects the location of the user to the location of the story with kid-friendly measurements to show the distance! Kids are also given a voice while they explore the latest news. They can rate articles, ask questions, and submit drawings to NOM. Readers’ questions are vetted and answered every day by the Editor-in-Chief, and drawings are featured in the app’s News Room. NOM covers many stories about the oceans and its inhabitants promoting awareness and educating a new generation to respect and preserve our Earth. NOM is available for all Apple mobile devices and a free trial is available on the app store by clicking here .

Recent stories include:

A Whale of a Record - 4/1/14 Deep Sea Discovery - 2/11/14
Greenland's Iceberg Maker - 2/6/14 Down with Pirates - 1/17/14
Australia's Plan to Kill Sharks - 1/17/14 New Life in the Arctic Sea - 12/13/13
Green Sea Turtles Return to Florida - 12/12/13            Who Owns the North Pole? - 12/12/13

 

 

Encyclopedia of Life

One Species at a Time podcasts from the Encyclopedia of Life are hosted by Ari Daniel Shapiro and produced by Atlantic Public Media. The One Species at a Time podcast series from the Encyclopedia of Life provides a chance to dive into the world of biodiversity through lively, 3-5 minute audio stories about species. The podcasts are accompanied by a Meet the Scientist feature page, multimedia extras, interesting facts and relevant educational materials.

Creative Commons Attributions 3.0 United States License

 

Killer Whale

Killer Whale

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Imagine yourself immersed in a chilly, blue, three-dimensional world, one where vision isn’t much use but sound travels far. That’s the leap of the imagination demanded of scientists like Volker Deecke who study killer whales. Deecke and his colleagues must sort myth from science to learn the secrets of these consummate predators. Ari Daniel Shapiro reports from the Shetland Islands.

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Marine Iguana

Marine Iguana

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No iguana wants to be cooked alive on a hot rock and then served up as dinner for a Galapagos hawk. But it turns out the marine iguanas have a strategy that warns them of the presence of hawks they can’t see. They learned to tune in to a kind of police scanner…the alarm calls of mockingbirds.

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North Atlantic Right Whale

North Atlantic Right Whale

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Hear how research unfolds at sea. Playing female whale calls into the water, researcher Susan Parks suddenly finds herself the center of attention of a group of male North Atlantic Right Whales. Will she be able to gather crucial data before a breaching whale crashes down on her boat?

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Polar bear

Polar bear

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In this podcast, host Ari Daniel Shapiro relates two close calls with polar bears. Listen as Heather Cray recalls how, dumped by a storm on a small Arctic island, she got an unexpected wake-up call. And when researcher Steve Amstrup accidentally crashed through the roof of a polar bear’s den, no one could predict what happened next.

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Red Knot

Red Knot

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The red knot is a tiny shorebird that undertakes a mind-boggling migration from the tip of South America all the way to the Arctic Circle. One of the few stops on that marathon journey is the Delaware Bay, an estuary that offers a banquet for migrating birds. Here, for some 20,000 years, red knots have flocked by the thousands to fuel their journey. But humans may be writing a tragic ending to this extraordinary evolutionary success story, unless biologists armed with an unusual tool can win a race against time.

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Red Paper Lantern Jellyfish

Red Paper Lantern Jellyfish

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Vacuumed up from its habitat a mile down in the ocean, the red paper lantern jelly may not look like much. Mostly water, it’s so fragile that once brought to the surface it’s reduced to a tattered blob in a jar. But this unassuming jellyfish has lessons for scientists. It’s teaching researchers in Japan how intricately life is connected down in the ocean’s deep, dark depths—and how the fate of this small red lantern sheds light on the fragility of life close to home.

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Sanibel Shells

Sanibel Shells

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Ari Daniel Shapiro joins the serious beachcombers along the high-tide line of Sanibel Island, Florida. These “shellers” come in search of beautiful sea shells, sometimes no bigger than a grain of rice, that are the remains of marine snails, bivalves, and other mollusks . Along the way, Ari learns why Sanibel’s shores are so rich in molluscan treasure, and how shelling has captured the imaginations of scientists and enthusiasts alike.

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Sea Butterflies

Sea Butterflies

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In the ocean, a drama is playing out between two marine mollusks: sea butterflies--tiny swimming snails the size of a grain of sand (also known as Pteropods) —and the larger sea angel that preys on them. But it’s another drama, one on a global scale, that concerns marine biologist Gareth Lawson and sculptor Cornelia Kavanagh: the changing chemistry of our warming oceans. The scientist and artist are collaborating to bring that story to a wider audience in the hope of rewriting the ending. Ari Daniel Shapiro reports from Woods Hole, Massachusetts, and New York City.

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Sea Cucumbers

Sea Cucumbers

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What reef animal comes in a rainbow of crazy colors, can throw out its innards to immobilize predators, then creep away and regrow a brand-new stomach? It’s the sea cucumber, prized as a gastronomic delight by some cultures and beginning to yield some of its secrets to scientists. Follow host Ari Daniel Shapiro from a Chinatown market to the reefs of Fiji to learn more about this amazing creature.

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Sea Grapes Google Earth Tour

Sea Grapes Google Earth Tour

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“Sea grapes” may sound like something Poseidon would snack on, and not a killer algae. Yet Caulerpa racemosa var. cylindracea poses a serious threat to marine life. Spread by the bilge water of boats, this fast-growing alga is quick to take root, squeezing out native species. But there is one spot in the Mediterranean where cylindracea hasn’t yet taken over, and biologists like Juan Manuel Ruiz Fernández are trying to discover why.

Narrated by Ari Daniel Shapiro . Produced by Atlantic Public Media  and Eduardo Garcia Milagros.

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