[google-translator]
76,702 OCEAN PASSPORTS
1,473 PARCELS SPONSORED
1,239 SPECIES FRIENDED

global warming

Global Ocean Currents Could Be Changed By Warmer And Saltier Water In The Future

Photo: Christoffer Engström/Unsplash

Global Ocean Currents Could Be Changed By Warmer And Saltier Water In The Future

Source: Phys.org/Catherine Collins, From Horizon Magazine, Horizon: The EU Research & Innovation Magazine - March 12, 2018

Melting ice shelves are changing the ocean's chemistry at the South Pole and the result could be a change in global currents and increased glacial more…

Major Study Brings To Light The Lesser Known Consequence of Ocean Warming: Oxygen Depletion

Photo: Brandon Kawamura/Unsplash

Major Study Brings To Light The Lesser Known Consequence of Ocean Warming: Oxygen Depletion

Source: Phys.org/University of Exeter - March 8, 2018

A major study into an ancient climate change event that affected a significant percentage of Earth's oceans has brought into sharp focus a lesser-known villain more…

New Perspectives: How Six Americans Changed Their Minds On Global Warming

Photo: Jasper van der Meij/Unsplash

New Perspectives: How Six Americans Changed Their Minds On Global Warming

Source: The New York Times/Livia Albeck-Ripka - March 2, 2018

The Rev. Richard Cizik used to believe climate change was a myth. The science had to be rigged, he thought; those who believed in it more…

The Microbiomes Of Corals: How Warming And Acidification Affect Coral Species Differently

Photo: Vlad Tchompalov/Unsplash

The Microbiomes Of Corals: How Warming And Acidification Affect Coral Species Differently

Source: Hakai Magazine/Jason G. Goldman - February 27, 2018

Though they look like rocks, corals are actually living organisms. Or, more accurately, communities of organisms. Each coral lives in symbiosis with the algae that more…

Slinging Sediment: Seagrass May Be Seriously Underestimated As a Carbon Sink

Photo: John Mark Arnold/Unsplash

Slinging Sediment: Seagrass May Be Seriously Underestimated As a Carbon Sink

Source: Hakai Magazine/Evan Lubofsky - February 14, 2018

Seagrass meadows take up less than 0.1 percent of the world’s oceans; nevertheless, they are considered a huge carbon sink. Seagrass draws carbon dioxide out more…

Warming Events Put Coral Reefs In Hot Water, Slowing Recovery

Photo: Jakob Owens/Unsplash

Warming Events Put Coral Reefs In Hot Water, Slowing Recovery

Source: Phys.org/David Colgan/UC Los Angeles - February 7, 2018

As the world's oceans heat up with climate change, coral reefs are increasingly under threat. Bleaching events—defense mechanisms against high temperatures that turn corals white—have more…

Melting Ice From Climate Change Will Make Volcanic Eruptions More Frequent – And More Dangerous

Photo: Shawn Appel/Unsplash

Melting Ice From Climate Change Will Make Volcanic Eruptions More Frequent – And More Dangerous

Source: Hakai Magazine/Michael Tennesen - February 6, 2018

When I meet up with geophysicist Magnus Guðmundsson in April 2017, the volcano Katla has been rumbling all week, creating a steady drumroll of small more…

Ringed Seals Can Adapt Quickly to Climate Change, But There’s One Drawback

Photo: Shawn Dahle/NOAA/Wikimedia Commons (CC0)

Ringed Seals Can Adapt Quickly to Climate Change, But There’s One Drawback

Source: Hakai Magazine/K. N. Smith - January 18, 2018

The ringed seals that live on Norway’s Svalbard archipelago are learning a new way of life as sea ice fades from their fjords. But scientists more…

Climate Change Is a Major Driver of Collapse in Marine Food Webs

Photo: Enric Sala

Climate Change Is a Major Driver of Collapse in Marine Food Webs

Source: Phys.org/University of Adelaide - January 12, 2018

A new study has found that levels of commercial fish stocks could be harmed as rising sea temperatures affect their source of food.

University of more…

Decades-Old Pollution is Being Unlocked by Sea Level Rise Into Chesapeake Bay

Photo: Bob Burkhard/Unsplash

Decades-Old Pollution is Being Unlocked by Sea Level Rise Into Chesapeake Bay

Source: Hakai Magazine/Roberta Kwok - January 12, 2018

In 2015, Kate Tully visited farms near the eastern shore of the Chesapeake Bay. She was investigating whether sea level rise had caused brackish water more…