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Climoji: The Social Media Tool Changing The Way We Communicate About Ocean Conservation

Source: The TerraMar Project - January 19, 2018 in Featured, The Arts, TMP

Climoji: The Social Media Tool Changing The Way We Communicate About Ocean Conservation
Photo: Jeremy Bishop/Unsplash

People use Emoji’s every day while communicating with friends, family, and co-workers. It’s really become such a mainstream way for people to express their feelings.

We relate to Emojis, and they have this incredible ability to give a sentence more emotion. And they’re everywhere we turn nowadays!

Interestingly, a group of artists and conservationists saw the huge potential in designing a unique set of emojis to help the world communicate about climate change and other environmental topics.

The idea is simple:

climate change + emoji = Climoji

Led by international environmental artist Marina Zurkow and recent NYU gradate Viniyata Pany at New York University, Climoji covers some of the most important topics facing our world’s oceans. From climate change and rising sea levels to overfishing and plastic pollution, the Climoji’s present an opportunity link the daily conversations we have directly with these issues.

“Climoji are needed representations of realities that are as tangible (if not more) as weather or homes – yes, these are scary, unpleasant, or uncomfortable ones – we don’t like to think about waste, or deforestation or hurricanes. We hope that these subjects cease being subjects of controversy or avoidance.” Marina explains.

“Climate change is not exactly the kind of subject matter most people are addressing in their intimate SMS conversations! But if a starving polar bear becomes a metaphor for personal despair, then the language of climate change might actually be entering into the common discourse. Instead of these issues being compartmentalized and opt-in, we recognize them as potent. Artistic expression and the construction of non-scientific visual or verbal language are more than illustrations; when successfully rendered, they resonate and become a lens for seeing the world in new ways.”

Climojis are now available to download as a sticker pack on iPhones and Android devices. You can also access the Climoji PNG set and learn more about the project at https://climoji.org/

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